share this page
Does your new Shubb Capo seem too tight for your guitar neck?

When we upgraded the design of our Standard line of capos in 2013, we also made some changes in the production process. A few months later we discovered that a new bending technique had resulted in an unplanned variability in the shape of the middle piece. The variation is so subtle that it’s hard to spot just by looking at it, but on some of the capos produced during that period, the curve of that piece is slightly flatter.

When we first discovered this variation, we studied its effect on the capo’s function. It did not alter the over-center locking action, so we decided that it was not a problem. But soon we received a few reports of our Standard capos being too tight for some larger guitar necks. On closer examination we learned that those capos with the flatter curve were losing some of the widest part of their range, and not properly accommodating the largest guitar necks.

We have since corrected this, and our capo’s uniformity and range are back to where we want them.


Not all of our capos from this period had this flatter curve, and not all users who got one would be effected. We estimate that less than 2% of users would be effected by this.

But if you are one of those who were effected, and if your new Shubb Capo is too tight to be useful on your instrument, we’d like to swap with you for one that will work better.

Here’s what to do:

Email us and tell us which model capo you have, and approximately when you bought it. If it is handy for you to take a digital picture of your capo, then please attach one. If we determine that it qualifies for an exchange, we will send you a postage-paid envelope to return your capo. As soon as we get it, we will send you a replacement that has the correct range.

Only the following models were subject to this variation and qualify for this exchange:
Polished nickel (C1, C2, C3, C4, C5)
Brushed Nickel (C1n, C2n, C3n, C4n, C5n)
Capo Noir (C1k, C2k, C3k, C4, C5k).
And only those with the roller design that was introduced in January 2013.

Meanwhile, here is a trick you can use if your capo is too tight. Rotate the rubber sleeve 180º, so that one of its thinner walls presses the strings. This will add quite a lot to the wide end of the capo’s range. If you are satisfied with this solution, then all is well. If you aren't happy with the look of the rotated sleeve, then contact us as above.
            rotate the sleeve

...Rick Shubb, January 2015